Blueberry Breakfast Pudding Vivian Howard

  • 14 ounces sourdough bread (crusts trimmed, if desired), cut into 1-inch cubes (6 cups)
  • 2 1/2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries
  • Finely grated zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 cups whole or low-fat milk
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 4 medium eggs (may substitute 3 large eggs)
  • 1/2 cup sugar, plus 1/3 cup for sprinkling
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Grease a 9-by-13-inch baking dish with cooking oil spray.

Toss together the bread cubes, blueberries, rosemary and lemon zest in a mixing bowl. Spread in the baking dish.

Whisk together the milk, heavy cream, eggs, 1/2 cup of the sugar, the vanilla extract and salt in the same bowl you just used, until well blended. Pour over the mixture in the baking dish and stir gently to moisten all the bread cubes. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to overnight.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Stir together the remaining 1/3 cup of sugar and the nutmeg in a bowl, then sprinkle that mixture over the bread pudding. Bake for 1 hour or until nicely browned.

Serve warm.

Welsh Rarebit by Robert Burns

50 grams butter
50 grams all-purpose flour
135 grams stout beer, such as Even More Jesus
375 grams heavy cream92b7adc8-239b-425a-a67a-37463dbffd2f--125_Welsh_rarebit
3 grams mustard powder
1 gram cayenne pepper
300 grams aged cheddar cheese, grated
1 loaf Polish rye bread
Worcestershire sauce

  • In a heavy-bottomed pot, melt the butter over medium heat. Once melted, whisk in the flour, and cook until the color shifts slightly darker, about 4 minutes. Add half the stout, making sure the beer is fully incorporated into the roux before adding the rest. Add half the cream, making sure it is fully incorporated into the mixture before adding the rest. Whisk in the mustard and cayenne to incorporate fully with no lumps. Cook until the mixture thickens nicely, 5 to 7 minutes. Be careful not to burn the bottom of the pan. Reduce the heat to medium-low and slowly add the cheddar, whisking after each addition. Be mindful of the heat: if the cheese begins to separate from the roux, cut the flame entirely. Let the rarebit mixture cool completely.
  • Slice the bread 1¼-inch/3cm thick and toast until golden. Let cool and top each slice with 75 grams of rarebit mixture. Use an offset spatula to spread the mixture evenly over the top of bread. Broil (grill) until bubbling and slightly darkened. Drizzle Worcestershire sauce over the hot rarebit, slice into 5 pieces, and serve immediately.
    Serves 6 as a snack

 

 

Pancotto (Tuscan Bread Soup)

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  • 1/2 pound (250 grams) stale white bread (Italian style loaf), crusts on
  • tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more for serving
  • 1/2 onion, finely chopped
  • small carrot, finely chopped
  • celery stick, finely chopped
  • clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp marjoram
  • 1/2 tsp oregano
  • pinch salt
  • pinch chili flakes
  • teaspoon dried chile (or chopped fresh chile)
  • cups (1 liter) water or veggie stock 
  • 3/4 cup (80 grams) finely grated Pecorino Romano or Parmesan cheese, divided
  • Handful of fresh parsley
  1. Roughly chop the bread into chunks, pass under some cold running water quickly to soften (but not soak), and crumble into pieces. Set aside.
  2. Add the olive oil to a large casserole or soup pot, and gently saute the onion, carrot, celery, and garlic with a pinch of salt until softened but not browned, about 10 minutes. Add the chile and water and bring to a boil. Add herbsLet simmer gently until the vegetables (in particular the carrot) are cooked through and the broth is fragrant, about 10 minutes.
  3. Add the bread and cook until the soup has become thick and creamy with the appearance of oatmeal, about 10 minutes. Stir through half the cheese and remove from the heat. Let sit a further 5 to 10 minutes, covered, before serving in shallow bowls with the rest of the cheese sprinkled on top, some herbs, and a drizzle of olive oil.  Serves 4

 

Multigrain Bread Makes two 9 by 5-inch loaves

Don’t confuse 7-grain hot cereal mix with boxed, cold breakfast cereals that may also be labeled “7-grain.” Our favorite brands of 7-grain mix are Bob’s Red Mill and Arrowhead Mills. Leftover bread can be wrapped in a double layer of plastic wrap and stored at room temperature for 3 days; wrap with an additional layer of aluminum foil and the bread can be frozen for up to one month.

6 1/4ounces 7-grain hot cereal mix , 1 1/4 cups, (see note above)
20ounces boiling water (2 1/2 cups)
15ounces unbleached all-purpose flour (3 cups), plus extra for dusting work surface
7 1/2ounces whole wheat flour (1 1/2 cups)
4tablespoons honey
4tablespoons unsalted butter , melted and cooled slightly
2 1/2teaspoons instant yeast
1tablespoon table salt
3/4cup pumpkin seeds or sunflower seeds, (unsalted)
1/2cup old-fashioned rolled oats or quick oats

1. Place cereal mix in bowl of standing mixer and pour boiling water over it; let stand, stirring occasionally, until mixture cools to 100 degrees and resembles thick porridge, about 1 hour. Whisk flours in medium bowl.
2. Once grain mixture has cooled, add honey, melted butter, and yeast and stir to combine. Attach bowl to standing mixer fitted with dough hook. With mixer running on low speed, add flours, 1/2 cup at a time, and knead until dough forms ball, 1 1/2 to 2 minutes; cover bowl with plastic and let dough rest 20 minutes. Add salt and knead on medium-low speed until dough clears sides of bowl, 3 to 4 minutes (if it does not clear sides, add 2 to 3 tablespoons additional all-purpose flour and continue mixing); continue to knead dough for 5 more minutes. Add seeds and knead for another 15 seconds. Transfer dough to floured work surface and knead by hand until seeds are dispersed evenly and dough forms smooth, taut ball. Place dough into greased container with 4-quart capacity; cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise until doubled, 45 to 60 minutes.
3. Adjust oven rack to middle position; heat oven to 375 degrees. Spray two 9 by 5-inch loaf pans with nonstick cooking spray. Transfer dough to lightly floured work surface and pat into 12 by 9-inch rectangle; cut dough in half crosswise with knife or bench scraper. Follow illustrations 1 through 3 below to shape loaves and coat with oats; cover lightly with plastic wrap and let rise until almost doubled in size, 30 to 40 minutes. (Dough should barely spring back when poked with knuckle.) Bake until internal temperature registers 200 degrees on instant-read thermometer, 35 to 40 minutes. Remove loaves from pans and cool on wire rack before slicing, about 3 hours.

Carrot Bread recipe from Jim Leahy’s “My Bread” cookbook

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One 10-inch round loaf.
3 cups bread flour, plus more for dusting
1 1/4 teaspoons table salt
1/4 teaspoon instant or other active dry yeast
1 1/2 cups freshly squeezed carrot juice
3/4 cup currants
3/4 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon cumin seeds

1.  In a medium bowl, stir together flour, salt, and yeast; add carrot juice. Using a wooden spoon or your hands, mix until a wet, sticky dough is formed, about 30 seconds. If it’s not really sticky to the touch, add another tablespoon or two of water. Add currants and walnuts and mix until incorporated. Cover bowl and let stand until surface is dotted with bubbles and dough is more than doubled in size, 12 to 18 hours.

2.  Generously dust work surface with flour. Using a bowl scraper or rubber spatula, scrape dough out of bowl in one piece. Using floured hands or a bowl scraper, lift edges of dough in toward center. Tuck in edges of dough to make a round.

3. Place a clean kitchen towel on work surface. Generously dust towel with flour and sprinkle with cumin seeds. Gently place dough on towel, seam side-down. If dough is tacky, dust top lightly with flour. Fold the ends of the towel loosely over dough to cover and place in a warm, draft-free spot to rise for 1 to 2 hours. Dough is ready when it is almost doubled in size and holds an impression when gently poked with a finger. If it springs back, let rise 15 minutes more.

4. Meanwhile, one half hour before the end of the second rise, preheat oven to 450 degrees with a rack set in bottom third of oven. Place a covered 4 1/2-to-5 1/2-quart cast-iron, high-quality all-ceramic, or enameled cast-iron (with plastic handle removed and screw hole plugged with aluminum foil) in the center of rack.

5. Using pot holders, very carefully remove preheated pot from oven and uncover. Unfold towel and quickly but gently invert dough into pot, seam side-up. Cover pot, return to oven, and bake for 25 minutes.

6. Uncover and continue baking until bread is a deep chestnut color, 15 to 20 minutes more. Using a heatproof spatula or pot holders, carefully lift bread out of pot and place it on a rack; let cool completely.